Who ever said that diamonds are a girl’s bestfriend?

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The dog was the first species to be domesticated and has been selectively bred over millennia for various behaviors, sensory capabilities, and physical attributes.

Their long association with humans has led dogs to be uniquely attuned to human behavior and they are able to thrive on a starch-rich diet that would be inadequate for other canid species. New research seems to show that dogs have mutations to equivalent genetic regions in humans where changes are known to trigger high sociability and somewhat reduced intelligence. Dogs vary widely in shape, size and colors. Dogs perform many roles for people, such as huntingherdingpulling loadsprotectionassisting police and militarycompanionship and, more recently, aiding handicapped individuals and therapeutic roles. This influence on human society has given them the sobriquet “man’s best friend“.

In 14th-century England, hound (from Old Englishhund) was the general word for all domestic canines, and dog referred to a subtype of hound, a group including the mastiff. It is believed this “dog” type was so common, it eventually became the prototype of the category “hound”. By the 16th century, dog had become the general word, and hound had begun to refer only to types used for hunting. The word “hound” is ultimately derived from the Proto-Indo-European word *kwon-, “dog”. This semantic shift may be compared with in German, where the corresponding words Dogge and Hund kept their original meanings. The term *ḱwon- may ultimately derive from the earliest layer of Proto-Indo-Europeanvocabulary. 

A male canine is referred to as a “dog”, while a female is traditionally called a “bitch” (derived from Middle English bicche, from Old English bicce, ultimately from Old Norse bikkja. Since the word “bitch” has taken on derogatory connotations, nowadays it is less commonly used to refer to dogs). The father of a litter is called the sire, and the mother is called the dam. The process of birth is “whelping”, from the Old English word hwelp; the modern English word “whelp” is an alternative term for puppy. A litter refers to the multiple offspring at one birth which are called puppies or pups from the French poupée, “doll”, which has mostly replaced the older term “whelp”.

Domestic dogs inherited complex behaviors, such as bite inhibition, from their wolf ancestors, which would have been pack hunters with complex body language. These sophisticated forms of social cognition and communication may account for their trainability, playfulness, and ability to fit into human households and social situations, and these attributes have given dogs a relationship with humans that has enabled them to become one of the most successful species on the planet today. 

The dogs’ value to early human hunter-gatherers led to them quickly becoming ubiquitous across world cultures. Dogs perform many roles for people, such as huntingherdingpulling loadsprotectionassisting police and militarycompanionship, and, more recently, aiding handicapped individuals. This influence on human society has given them the nickname “man’s best friend” in the Western world. In some cultures, however, dogs are also a source of meat which is frowned upon by the majority and deemed as animal abuse.

The majority of contemporary people with dogs describe their pet as part of the family, although some ambivalence about the relationship is evident in the popular reconceptualization of the dog–human family as a pack. A dominance model of dog–human relationships has been promoted by some dog trainers, such as on the television program Dog Whisperer. However it has been disputed that “trying to achieve status” is characteristic of dog–human interactions. Pet dogs play an active role in family life; for example, a study of conversations in dog–human families showed how family members use the dog as a resource, talking to the dog, or talking through the dog, to mediate their interactions with each other.

Increasingly, human family members are engaging in activities centered on the perceived needs and interests of the dog, or in which the dog is an integral partner, such as dog dancing and dog yoga.

According to statistics published by the American Pet Products Manufacturers Association in the National Pet Owner Survey in 2009–2010, it is estimated there are 77.5 million people with pet dogs in the United States. The same survey shows nearly 40% of American households own at least one dog, of which 67% own just one dog, 25% two dogs and nearly 9% more than two dogs. There does not seem to be any gender preference among dogs as pets, as the statistical data reveal an equal number of female and male dog pets. Yet, although several programs are ongoing to promote pet adoption, less than a fifth of the owned dogs come from a shelter.

The latest study using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) comparing humans and dogs showed that dogs have same response to voices and use the same parts of the brain as humans do. This gives dogs the ability to recognize emotional human sounds, making them friendly social pets to humans. 

The scientific evidence is mixed as to whether companionship of a dog can enhance human physical health and psychological wellbeing. Studies suggesting that there are benefits to physical health and psychological wellbeing have been criticised for being poorly controlled, and finding that “the health of elderly people is related to their health habits and social supports but not to their ownership of, or attachment to, a companion animal.” Earlier studies have shown that people who keep pet dogs or cats exhibit better mental and physical health than those who do not, making fewer visits to the doctor and being less likely to be on medication than non-guardians.

The health benefits of dogs can result from contact with dogs in general, and not solely from having dogs as pets. For example, when in the presence of a pet dog, people show reductions in cardiovascular, behavioral, and psychological indicators of anxiety. Other health benefits are gained from exposure to immune-stimulating microorganisms, which, according to the hygiene hypothesis, can protect against allergies and autoimmune diseases. The benefits of contact with a dog also include social support, as dogs are able to not only provide companionship and social support themselves, but also to act as facilitators of social interactions between humans. One study indicated that wheelchair users experience more positive social interactions with strangers when they are accompanied by a dog than when they are not. In 2015, a study found that pet owners were significantly more likely to get to know people in their neighborhood than non-pet owners.

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Dogs are wonderful and I will cherish them like pals and companions rather than a pet. However, I strongly believe they need discipline in order to feel loved, because they are mentally wired on either being dominated or being the ones dominant. Mexican-American dog behaviorist with over 25 years of canine experience, , CESAR MILAN said, ” A pack leader doesn’t project emotional or nervous energy, so neither should you. In the wild, the pack leader uses calm-assertive energy to influence how the dog interacts with his surroundings. She enforces these laws in a quiet way, as is the case when a mother picks up a puppy by the scruff of the neck if he strays outside the den”.

I have 6 adopted dogs as of the moment, 4 puppies and their parents and training them has become a normal routine for me and my husband.(A DAY IN THE LIFE of THE “caged” — UNAPOLOGETICALLY ME — Quora  )Dogs are very smart and adjustable, they make reliable companions given the right environment and “pack leaders”. Just like cats, they are a gift of nature and they deserve no less than our unconditional love…

 

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(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dog ; https://www.cesarsway.com/dog-psychology/pack-leader/how-to-be-a-pack-leader)

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Mae Jacolo Aguilar”apple”THE MULTI- TOPIC BLOG- writes about personal interests& passion.specializing on HUMAN BEHAVIOR. elicits toxic reaction by annoyance.certified weirdo& a nurse

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